Rancher Ogden Driskill of Devils Tower, Wyo. is the Senate District 1 hopeful after the Nov. 2 general election. His priorities will be to reduce government spending, ensure private property rights and return control to the counties and cities.
Rancher Ogden Driskill of Devils Tower, Wyo. is the Senate District 1 hopeful after the Nov. 2 general election. His priorities will be to reduce government spending, ensure private property rights and return control to the counties and cities.
By Sara Thissen
Ogden Driskill of Devils Tower, Wyo. is a life long rancher and a politician. On Aug. 17, he ousted his two fellow opponents Terry Henderson of Shawnee and Tom Dunlap of Keeline during the Republican primary election to become the Senate District 1 hopeful since there hasn’t been a Democrat to file intentions.
Senate District 1 is Wyoming’s largest district in terms of geography, which includes Crook, Weston and Niobrara counties as well as parts of eastern Converse and northeastern Goshen counties. However, the district is comprised of many small towns along with a strong agricultural community says Driskill.
Driskill is a fifth-generation rancher and runs a cow/calf and sheep operation with his wife Rosanne of 29 years. He obtained an agricultural business degree from Casper College and attended the University of Wyoming, and in 1990 he took over the management of his family’s ranch.
This is not Driskill’s first time running for a political office. He ran for the House and was denied the seat in 2000; also he served as state committeeman for the Republican Party. As he looks ahead to the Nov. 2 general election, he hopes to bring more local control back to the citizens, which has been consolidated in Cheyenne for some time, according to Driskill.
Driskill has gained experience from serving on many local, state and national boards. He has served one term as regional vice-president for the Wyoming Stock Growers Association, and on the boards for the Crook County Irrigation District, Land Trust Alliance, and Partnership of Rangeland Trusts to name a few.
With his lobbyist experience, he carries a large amount of knowledge about moving items through legislation. His leadership of being able to get things accomplished will be utilized if elected, he says.
Through his leadership and pervious political experience, he will be able to form working relationships with others in the legislature. His ability to get things done have not gone unnoticed, as he was invited to testify before the U.S. House of Agriculture Committee in regards to the livestock marketing industry.
“I have a deep knowledge and understanding for politics, especially the natural resources industry,” says Driskill.
If elected to the Wyoming Senate, his priorities will be to reduce government spending, ensure private property rights and return control to the counties and cities. When he first decided to run for the Senate, he wasn’t keen on a certain issue but plans to co-sponsor many legislation pieces, he says.
“When I decided to run, I didn’t have any intentions to support a single issue but to be a strong conservative for the district who is able to get items passed through legislation,” says Driskill.
There are many issues Driskill would like to see consideration made on. At the top of his list is to see Wyoming stay financially sound. However, the legislature has been allocating most of the surplus to spending rather than adding to the permanent minerals trust fund. “I would like to see Wyoming put away funds for the future so when the oil and gas industries are depleted, we have money to bounce back from,” says Driskill.
Wyoming has also seen a large amount of expense to assist the brucellosis test and slaughter program, costing them roughly around $1.3 million just to remove brucellosis positive elk. Wyoming’s cattle industry faces struggles as well because brucellosis can be contracted to cattle, which has allowed exporting out of Wyoming difficult for the state. In 2004, Gov. Freudenthal created a task force to find ways to manage the disease throughout the state. Driskill does not believe the federal government has taken the right position on the brucellosis issue. He says brucellosis is a tough issue for the state Wyoming to combat.
“I wish the Feds would take responsibility for the impacts of brucellosis and predators on the State of Wyoming.  Their unwillingness to deal with these problems amounts to a huge unfunded liability to the State of Wyoming and its producers,” Driskill says.
The coal mining industry in Wyoming still continues to be beneficial. As most of the land is comprised for agriculture use, mining companies are very consciousness about taking care of the land says Driskill.
“I’m a huge supporter for the mining industry,” says Driskill as mining will still be a benefit for Wyoming.
Driskill also plans to help fight Obama’s health care plan, address immigration reform to by getting law in Wyoming like the state of Arizona and water rights work to strengthen Wyoming’s water law and making sure local entities are compensated if water is taken out of their area.
Driskill is an advocate for private property rights and a founding member of the Wyoming Stock Growers Agricultural Land Trust. The land trust is about conserving Wyoming farms and ranches through conservation easements. Driskill says he will continue to support private property rights and keeping open spaces available to their rightful owners.
He hopes to be a voice in Wyoming legislation and able to restore private property rights and give control to rural citizens. Driskill encourages citizens in District 1 to contact him with issues or concerns, he says.
Ogden Driskill of Devils Tower, Wyo. is a life long rancher and a politician. On Aug. 17, he ousted his two fellow opponents Terry Henderson of Shawnee and Tom Dunlap of Keeline during the Republican primary election to become the Senate District 1 hopeful since there hasn’t been a Democrat to file intentions.
Senate District 1 is Wyoming’s largest district in terms of geography, which includes Crook, Weston and Niobrara counties as well as parts of eastern Converse and northeastern Goshen counties. However, the district is comprised of many small towns along with a strong agricultural community says Driskill.
Driskill is a fifth-generation rancher and runs a cow/calf and sheep operation with his wife Rosanne of 29 years. He obtained an agricultural business degree from Casper College and attended the University of Wyoming, and in 1990 he took over the management of his family’s ranch.
This is not Driskill’s first time running for a political office. He ran for the House and was denied the seat in 2000; also he served as state committeeman for the Republican Party. As he looks ahead to the Nov. 2 general election, he hopes to bring more local control back to the citizens, which has been consolidated in Cheyenne for some time, according to Driskill.
Driskill has gained experience from serving on many local, state and national boards. He has served one term as regional vice-president for the Wyoming Stock Growers Association, and on the boards for the Crook County Irrigation District, Land Trust Alliance, and Partnership of Rangeland Trusts to name a few.
With his lobbyist experience, he carries a large amount of knowledge about moving items through legislation. His leadership of being able to get things accomplished will be utilized if elected, he says.
Through his leadership and pervious political experience, he will be able to form working relationships with others in the legislature. His ability to get things done have not gone unnoticed, as he was invited to testify before the U.S. House of Agriculture Committee in regards to the livestock marketing industry.
“I have a deep knowledge and understanding for politics, especially the natural resources industry,” says Driskill.
If elected to the Wyoming Senate, his priorities will be to reduce government spending, ensure private property rights and return control to the counties and cities. When he first decided to run for the Senate, he wasn’t keen on a certain issue but plans to co-sponsor many legislation pieces, he says.
“When I decided to run, I didn’t have any intentions to support a single issue but to be a strong conservative for the district who is able to get items passed through legislation,” says Driskill.
There are many issues Driskill would like to see consideration made on. At the top of his list is to see Wyoming stay financially sound. However, the legislature has been allocating most of the surplus to spending rather than adding to the permanent minerals trust fund. “I would like to see Wyoming put away funds for the future so when the oil and gas industries are depleted, we have money to bounce back from,” says Driskill.
Wyoming has also seen a large amount of expense to assist the brucellosis test and slaughter program, costing them roughly around $1.3 million just to remove brucellosis positive elk. Wyoming’s cattle industry faces struggles as well because brucellosis can be contracted to cattle, which has allowed exporting out of Wyoming difficult for the state. In 2004, Gov. Freudenthal created a task force to find ways to manage the disease throughout the state. Driskill does not believe the federal government has taken the right position on the brucellosis issue. He says brucellosis is a tough issue for the state Wyoming to combat.
“I wish the Feds would take responsibility for the impacts of brucellosis and predators on the State of Wyoming.  Their unwillingness to deal with these problems amounts to a huge unfunded liability to the State of Wyoming and its producers,” Driskill says.
The coal mining industry in Wyoming still continues to be beneficial. As most of the land is comprised for agriculture use, mining companies are very consciousness about taking care of the land says Driskill.
“I’m a huge supporter for the mining industry,” says Driskill as mining will still be a benefit for Wyoming.
Driskill also plans to help fight Obama’s health care plan, address immigration reform to by getting law in Wyoming like the state of Arizona and water rights work to strengthen Wyoming’s water law and making sure local entities are compensated if water is taken out of their area.
Driskill is an advocate for private property rights and a founding member of the Wyoming Stock Growers Agricultural Land Trust. The land trust is about conserving Wyoming farms and ranches through conservation easements. Driskill says he will continue to support private property rights and keeping open spaces available to their rightful owners.
He hopes to be a voice in Wyoming legislation and able to restore private property rights and give control to rural citizens. Driskill encourages citizens in District 1 to contact him with issues or concerns, he says.