The Cattle Business Weekly
  • Making marginal cropland better by converting it to pasture
    In McHenry County, North Dakota, David Woodall regularly dealt with marginal farmland. He describes these acres as “flooded in wet years, and blowing [due to soil erosion] in dry years.” Additionally, he explains that the hilly, remote cropland was difficult to get machinery to for planting and harvesting. All total, Woodall recognized it didn’t make economic or environmental sense to keep this land as cropland.
  • What’s happening at Nathan Palm Angus
    May is the optimal month for calving, especially this year. At Nathan Palm Angus near Estelline, S.D. the cattle graze in open fields and pastures where they drop their calves. 
  • Saddle up with the Gonsoir Ranch Family of Groton, S.D.
    Even today, horses are at the center of most Gonsoir family time. Pull into their Groton farmyard on any given day and you’re apt to find the family together cleaning stalls, driving out to check cows, working horses in the arena or, if their chores are done, at the living room table playing cards or board games
  • Southeast SD Farmer discusses soil health techniques
    Including no-till, cover crops, planting green, and livestock integration to develop higher quality soil
  • Eddy Stock Farm: 2018 Environmental Stewardship Award Winners
    Son of a longtime soil and water district commissioner, Randy Eddy has been on the forefront of conservation measures for his whole life.
  • GrazeNebraska: Kalkowski family focused on stewardship in Boyd County, Neb.
    In the 1950’s Larry and Kay Lynn Kalkowski were teachers by trade, but it was their purchase of pasture and farmland in Boyd County, Neb., – in the northcentral part of the state bordering South Dakota – that became the best classroom for teaching their four sons. The Kalkowski ranch was especially beneficial in teaching the lesson of stewardship of natural resources. 
  • Veterinarian Russ Daly recognized with Excellence in Service award
    Daly is an SDSU Professor in the Veterinary & Biomedical Sciences Department, the SDSU Extension Veterinarian and State Public Health Veterinarian.
  • SD Simmental breeder fights stage four Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma
    Kipp has had the cancer—Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma at stage four, currently—for about three years and has been misdiagnosed with everything from farmer’s lung to asthma and severe allergies, but Kipp never quit trying to get to the bottom of his sickness.
  • Lightsey cattle ranch in Florida has South Dakota ties
    In a state known for magic kingdoms, luxurious living, beautiful beaches and alligators, the Lightsey ranch showcases the jewel of agriculture as one of the state’s top cattle operations.
  • The Feickert Farm Family of Aberdeen, SD
    As a farmer-legislator, Dennis Feickert saw a need to share his first-hand experiences with legislators who did not have on-farm or ranch experience. “There were maybe 10 of us, out of 105, who have actually sold a bushel of corn or pulled a calf,” Dennis says. “The ag industry needs a voice in Pierre - just like local government needs a voice in Pierre.”
  • India Insight: SDARL class returns from overseas travel
    Billy Clanton of Buffalo, Peggy Bieber of Leola, and Bo Slovek of Philip, are all cattle producers so venturing to a country that holds cattle scared and doesn’t eat it for meat was a definite change of pace.
  • Crago Cattle Company recognized with the Ranching Heritage Breeder award from AQHA
    The Crago Cattle Company has roots deep in that tradition, dating back as far as 1887 when Peter Crago emigrated from England, homesteading in South Dakota. The first 320 acres were an orchard, but when Peter’s son, Charles, purchased the land, he soon focused on developing cattle, draft horses, and ranch horses.
  •  March madness for Best Angus
    Winter conditions, rescheduled bull sale, ranch work and commissioner duties kept this family moving in March
  • Laubys honored as 2018 Farm Family of the Year
    They are Southsiders, a nickname given years ago to the families farming and living on the south side of the Platte River. For 111 years they have been a part of Dawson County agriculture.
  • Dybdal Charolais in Nebraska
    They run about 200 Charolais cows and 150 commercial black cows. They also grow about 1,500 acres of corn, soybeans and alfalfa.
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Cattle Business Weekly P.O. Box 700 Philip, SD 57567
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