Bruner Angus involves the family’s three sons and their families. Left to right: Landon,  Trenton,  Rachel,  Travis,  Frankie, Ashley, Rayna, Erin, Ty, Kim and Blaine.
Bruner Angus involves the family’s three sons and their families. Left to right: Landon, Trenton, Rachel, Travis, Frankie, Ashley, Rayna, Erin, Ty, Kim and Blaine.

 

By Beth Roth


The Bruner family from Drake, N.D. are about a month away from their annual production sale. With the sale scheduled for February 18, Kim and Blaine, along with their three sons and daughters-in-law are already hard at work getting ready. Blaine shared his list of top 5 things he couldn’t do without during their production sale.

1. Our Family. 

“This is by far the most important,” says Blaine.  Each of the couple’s three sons and daughters-in-law are involved in the operation and share in the responsibilities and decision-making. “It makes it nice,” he says. Everything from the food to the cattle to making the place look presentable, takes a lot of coordination and team work


2. Help from our Friends and Neighbors.

“We have lots of friends and neighbors who call and ask ‘what can we help with, what can we do,’” says Blaine. The family’s friends and neighbors put in a lot of hours, helping to set up pens and pen the cattle for the day of the sale, as well as helping the day of the sale. 

“It’s nice to have that. It’s nice to have someone you can depend on,” saysBlaine. “And it’s nice to have someone who’s been here consistently because they understand the routine that we go through. You don’t have to tell them what to do. It’s a matter of showing up and digging in.”


 3.Good, Reputable Cattle

The Bruner family is very proud of their herd and the bulls they offer for sale. “They are going to stand out with good feet and legs. They are going to last,” says Blaine. “They have a disposition where people can work with them and handle them. They are cattle that you can trust and at the same time, be proud of.” 


4. Faithful Customers

Every successful operation needs customers who are willing to invest in the program. “You couldn’t be without your customers. You need to treat them right and treat them fairly,” says Blaine. “If you treat them right, they’ll treat you right is the way I look at it.”

“There are problems that come up with these cattle. Not every one is going to go out and do exactly what they’re supposed to,” Blaine points out. “You just need to visit with your customers and make sure you work through whatever issues there might be.”


5. Good Weather

“There’s nothing we can do about the weather, but you have to deal with whatever you get,” Blaine says. “When the weather isn’t nice, it’s easier for people to stay home.” 

 A number of years ago, the family ran into a string of bad weather on sale day three years in a row. “The first two years, we were set that we were going to deal with whatever weather we got,” Blaine says. “Well, the second year especially got quite bad. We had to open roads, with our own equipment, to get people here and as soon as the sale was over, we had to open roads again so people could get back out. That wasn’t the best deal.” 

When the third year of bad weather hit, the family made the difficult decision to reschedule. “We called all the radio stations. We pulled out our customer list and called as many people as we could,“ Blaine remembers. “We rescheduled for a week later and it’s probably the best thing we ever did.”